Why Persistence is Public Relations’ Most Valuable Skill

While public relations may seem like a dazzling profession full of glam, glitz, and celebrities, PR pros understand how truly grueling the work can be. At times, PR can involve a lot of teamwork, determination, and patience, but most importantly, it involves persistence.

 

It’s easy for someone to write a press release about an upcoming event or initiative or even to create a landing page online for blog content. But to really drive results, PR experts understand how crucial it is to be persistent in your efforts – from media relations to content creation and social media, it takes more than distributing one press release every six months or posting one Tweet each week to really drive results.

 

When it comes to conducting media relations or PR campaigns, persistence is particularly important. In order to successfully conduct a media relations campaign, simply writing a release, publishing it on the company’s press page and hoping media will pick it up will likely will not cut it. Brands should consistently test out new story angles and hooks, follow up with media regularly – sharing additional information to pique their interest – and always be on the hunt for a new media contact who might be interested in sharing your story.

 

Besides that, media relations involves a lot of other tasks that require a persistent mindset. For instance, we hear “no” more times than we can count when reaching out to media with story ideas. PR pros invest a lot of time researching the perfect journalists just to find out they’re not interested in your topic. We also hear “maybe” a lot, which can often turn out to be dead ends. The trick is to not get discouraged, but rather see it as a challenge to overcome.

 

The point is a good PR pro understands you can’t take no for an answer. When one door closes, we find a way to open another. By researching additional contacts, sending out new pitches and continuing to persevere, we’re able to secure the results our clients deserve.

 

A young professional starting out in the world of PR might be surprised at just how much patience and perseverance the job takes. However, when you’re passionate about your clients, you don’t just give up. Instead, we work hard to find new opportunities, review past failures and keep trucking forward.

 

Public relations can be an extremely valuable tool for businesses of all sizes. Whether a company is well established or just starting out, it can be very beneficial to position your brand to the public in a proactive way to ensure your brand is well recognized. After all, behind any public relations campaign is a well-crafted strategy, precise messaging, and a whole lot of perseverance.

 

If you’re interested in learning how our team’s tenacious efforts can generate results for your company, contact Lauryn Gray, lauryn@dittoepr.com, or request a consultation today!

Consuming Media: Millennials vs. Baby Boomers

The ultimate goal of a #PRpro is securing stellar media coverage for our clients; however, that coverage can be less impactful if it’s not reaching the targeted audience. In a world increasingly influenced by technology, it’s important to remain knowledgable about how audiences are consuming media and staying informed.

 

We’re taking a closer look at how millennials and baby boomers consume media differently. Learn how it affects our strategies for telling our clients’ stories to the most influential audiences.

 

Baby Boomers

Baby Boomers, born between 1946-1964 and know sticking to their roots, are surprisingly open to new formats. In fact, research shows TV hold the top spot for Baby Boomers. More specifically, 51 percent of those older than 55 are found to rely on traditional news sources, including broadcast media.

 

While Baby Boomers are adopting social media sites like Facebook more and more, they are more likely to go straight to the source. They visit news outlets directly to stay informed, spending 20 plus hours a week consuming online content. If that doesn’t say how tied Baby Boomers are to traditional media, then knowing 92 percent of them continue to listen to the radio for news updates just may convince you.

 

So, if a client is trying to reach the highly respected Baby Boomer crowd, it’s evident that traditional media is the way to go. Leveraging local broadcast media can prove highly successful, especially in the early hours as the masses consume the news of the day before heading out to work. Don’t let the word traditional stray you away from online hits though, as an online article can garner thousands of eyes as the Boomers browse news sites throughout the week.

 

Millennials

Millennials, born between 1982-2002, are changing the way younger generations stay informed. Studies show millennials rely heavily on trending articles and major headlines on platforms like Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter. According to Business Insider, 64 percent of people ages 18-24 say digital outlets such as online news sources and social media serve as their main source of news.

 

As for traditional media, only 24 percent of millennials ages 18-24 and 29 percent of millennials ages 25-34 turn to broadcast television to get their news. Only 5 percent of those are turning to radio and print to stay informed. Instead, millennials are utilizing local and national news sites to dive deeper into major headlines found on social media sites. In comparison to Baby Boomers, millennials are twice as likely to opt in to retrieving information from social media and word of mouth than traditional news sources (cue the group text gossip).

 

That being said, when working with clients targeting younger generations, we often gear our strategic execution toward securing media opportunities that will surface across social media platforms. While traditional outlets still garner high viewership, online hits support the research and prove to produce valuable results for client coverage. It’s important to look at online mentions when securing opportunities, in addition to utilizing social channels to increase exposure by posting client-oriented coverage.

 

The way each generation consumes news is constantly changes, dictating how we approach our strategies in the public relations industry. As the latest-and-greatest tech updates continue to revolutionize our world, it’s crucial that we do our due diligence and capitalize on the appropriate opportunities that will effectively produce results for our clients.

 

Interested in reaching these audiences online? Request a consultation with us today!

 

How To Turn An Internship Into A Full-Time Job

Take it from us at Dittoe PR: internships are a great way to score a full-time job. With much of our office boasting the title of former Dittoe PR intern (myself included), it’s no wonder our program is one of the top in Indianapolis.

 

After interning for nearly a year, I quickly recognized that internships are mutually beneficial for both parties, with interns gaining valuable professional experience, networking and building their portfolios, and employers obtaining much-needed assistance, receiving a fresh perspective, and recruiting future employees. The “trial period” an internship offers allows employers to discover how much potential a student or recent graduate has and whether they’re ready to take the next steps towards becoming a #PRpro.

 

If you’re looking to make your internship into a full-time job, here are a few tips to increase your chances of getting hired.

 

Demonstrate a strong work ethic and engage.

 

Between exams, parties, and friends, interns can get easily sidetracked by outside distractions, but demonstrating a strong willingness to work and to showing up on time every day goes a long way. Some interns only work to check a box in their resume or satisfy school credit, but those students are missing out on a great opportunity to turn an internship into a full-time position.

 

Interns should realize it is engagement, not just a strong work ethic, that can help guarantee a full-time job offer. Demonstrate your enthusiasm to learn by taking efficient notes in meetings, attending non-mandatory company outings, and going above and beyond in what you’re asked. The best interns don’t simply complete the project – they find different ways to become a valuable resource in the office.

 

Solicit feedback.

 

In order to continue growing and developing a master PR skillset, interns should solicit feedback from supervisors and those they directly work with on a day-to-day basis. Seeking input will not only improve your skills, but it will prove you’re worth hiring. BONUS – it also shows you’re eager to advance.

 

After each completed task or project, ask your direct supervisor to sit down and discuss how you did. Find out how you can improve, or where you might have been lacking and how to make changes for the next go-around. While it might be difficult to hear constructive criticism at first, learning to seek it out will improve your interpersonal skills and show you’re thinking long-term.

 

Make use of downtime.

 

At Dittoe PR, we pride ourselves on the real client work we assign interns. No busy work or coffee runs here!

While that usually doesn’t provide for much downtime, should an intern encounter a lull in projects, it’s important they make good use of their time.

 

Instead of dwelling on social media or focusing on homework, interns should ask what additional projects they can help with. In this industry, it’s likely someone has a project that could use some TLC. Both the intern director and your colleagues will notice and remember that you took initiative and showed enthusiasm for the job.

 

Be honest about professional goals.

 

Let’s face the facts: no one’s a mind reader. If a full-time job offer is what you’re after in your internship, let your supervisor know.

 

Rather than being pushy, provide clarity about your goals. Make a point to tell them you’ve enjoyed your time at the company and would love to discuss any permanent opportunities. Even if the company can’t offer you a job, they’re more likely to keep you in mind should there be an opening.

 

On the flipside, if you’re looking to work in a different role post-internship, be honest about that too. Your internship supervisors serve as valuable professional references. Don’t let that opportunity slip away either.

 

Keep in touch.

 

If your internship ends before you’ve finished school, be sure to keep in touch with the company. Exchange contact information, add colleagues on LinkedIn, keep up with the company on social media, and find other ways you can stay connected. When you’re in town, consider dropping by the office or arranging a lunch to catch up with co-workers.

 

Also, if you say you’ll stay in touch, follow through with it. It’s not only courteous, but it will help to keep you at top-of-mind for any hiring decisions or requests for professional references.

 

Interested in an internship with Dittoe PR? Check out our career page here for more details.