How to Prep a Client for a Media Interview

At Dittoe Public Relations, we offer a variety of services that all help our clients put their best foot forward in their respective industries. You may have heard us refer to media relations as our “bread and butter,” and while it falls on us to secure the opportunities for coverage, it falls on our clients to execute a great interview (with a little help from us).

 

Let me start by saying that some clients are rockstar interviewees and love an opportunity to speak with media. To those clients, we salute you.

 

To the clients that don’t love the spotlight, we feel you. There is a reason we PR pros chose to be behind the camera instead of in front of it. We know you still love your companies but add in the lights, questions and the difference between a live shot and a look-live shot and all of a sudden, the thing you do every single day – talk about your goods and services – becomes incredibly complicated.

 

That’s where Dittoe PR comes in. We’re here to guide clients through the process, even the ones that are confident in their abilities, because, let’s face it, no one can ever be over-prepared. We make sure that no matter the outlet, format or interviewer, each of our clients are ready to knock every single interview out of the park.

 

Research.

Whenever we secure an interview, the first thing we do is research both the outlet and the reporter conducting the interview. Providing a synopsis of the target market of a publication can help frame the type of conversation. Is this a national publication or a specialized trade magazine? This knowledge can help shape the direction of the interview and set expectations.

 

Prior to pitching, we research reporter bios, beats and writing history. Fast forward to securing an opportunity and this knowledge gives us a feel for how they may conduct an interview, reducing the amount of potential surprises to our clients. We share all this information with our clients, so they feel at ease with the person (and media outlet) they’re conversing with.

 

Prep.

In addition to a thorough summary of who they’re going to be talking to, we also provide our clients with a detailed analysis of what topics will be addressed in the interview. This summary includes the story angle that secured the interview as well as key messages to support the client’s side of conversation.

 

We make sure that significant stats are top of mind and offer advice on how to give the perfect soundbite. We also offer suggestions on how to deliver flawless messaging, reduce background noise in phone interviews, and how to come across like an Emmy winner when on camera. We’ll even hold media training sessions with clients, as needed, to keep interview tips and tricks top of mind.

 

Execution.

When our clients go on interviews, we go on interviews. We listen it on phone interviews to provide introductions and take note of key information and necessary follow ups. With local TV interviews or larger national interviews, we accompany clients to the station, assist in visual setup and teardown, handle any final coordination with producers and reporters, and snap behind-the-scenes footage. Often times, we’re also helping with any last-minute prep – answering questions before going live – for the reporter conducting the interviews.

 

Trust us, as badly as we want the interview to go well, reporters want it to go well even more. Knowing that we’re there to take care of any issue that might arise lets our clients know that they, and we, have the situation under control. We also are committed to being visible and build real relationships with reporters outside of our email or phone exchanges.

 

At the end of the day, talking on live television or live radio can be daunting. At Dittoe PR, we put our clients at ease and help them navigate each individual interview as it comes along, leading to spectacular segments, articles, reports and coverage of all kinds.

 

Interested in getting more media coverage for your brand or company? Contact Lauryn Gray at lauryn@dittoepr.com to set up a consultation and learn more about our services.

How to Build A Successful Media List to Generate Coverage

The biggest part of our job is earning media coverage for our clients, which is done by pitching stories and developing relationships with journalists. Doing this effectively requires a strong media list, which is one of the key components to successful PR.

 

Now, you may be wondering, what is a media list? Simply put, it’s a compilation of reporters organized for the sole purpose of pitching them story ideas on behalf of your client. It’s highly organized and updated frequently to accommodate today’s fast-paced, ever-changing journalism landscape. It’s also customized per story idea.

 

If this sounds like a ton of work, it is. But that’s what makes our job so rewarding. And there are a ton of tools and tricks that help build excellent media lists. But if you’re still unsure of how to put one together, follow these steps.

 

Step 1: Determine Target Audience.

In order to determine the best reporters and publications to add to a media list, first determine target audiences, which should correlate with a client’s key customers. For instance, let’s say a client sells audio products such as headphones, soundbars and home theater systems. As a PR agency, the goal will be to educate tech-savvy individuals about the client’s products in the consumer electronic space. Therefore, the media list should reflect reporters who cover this beat for media outlets frequently read by this demographic. If the client has multiple audiences, make sure to build a media list for each one.

 

Step 2: Create a list of ideal outlets.

Once target audiences are determined, create a list of outlets that are a natural fit to cover your client’s story. This will also need to reflect the client’s PR goals.

 

So, if a global tech company is seeking national media coverage, the media list may include outlets such as Fast Company, Wired, Inc., Forbes and USA Today. But, if a client is seeking local coverage to help promote a local event in Chicago, outlets may include the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, The Red Eye and Crain’s Chicago Business, among others.

 

When creating this list, consider the outlet’s key readers. This can be accomplished by identifying its age group, gender or median income, among other key characteristics. Many times, these insights will be found in an outlet’s media kit. This will help ensure the outlet’s key readers are parallel with the client’s target audience.

 

Step 3: Find contacts.

Once those outlets have been determined, it’s time to do our homework and find the right contacts. During this portion, follow these tips:

 

  • Review previous stories to understand how frequently the writer pushes out new articles.
  • Learn about the writer’s interests to build a deeper connection through their bio page, LinkedIn or social media. For instance, when pitching a new product for our client LIDS, we take the time to understand if the writer has an allegiance to a specific team, so we can pitch them relevant products.
  • Be thoughtful about what topics writers cover in their stories. In some cases, people who write about the “technology industry” may not review “consumer electronics,” and “health care” writers don’t necessarily cover “health and medicine.”
  • Take time to consider each writer’s role. Editors-in-chief, for instance, are primarily responsible for the business-side of an outlet, like selecting content rather than creating it. Editorial assistants or staff writers, however, are usually looking for unique new stories and ideas.
  • When faced with multiple people at one publication, select only one or two for the first iteration of the list. If everyone has a similar title and seemingly covers the same topic, review past stories for each contact and narrow down from there.

 

Step 4: Conduct additional research.

Once those contacts are determined, pinpoint key words and conduct additional research to find contacts that may be a fit based on relevant stories that populate in Google News. For example, if you’re pitching a new parenting app that you want reporters to check out, search “apps for parents” or “parenting tech” in Google to see what type of writers are covering something similar to help build out your media list even further. In addition, conduct research to find media contacts who have covered the client in the past, written about the client’s competitors, and/or recently covered a trending news topics relevant to the client. This may help build out additional pitching angles.

 

 Step 5: Find contact information.

Depending on the media vertical, the contact information for the reporter may be easy to find and readily available on their designated bio page or in the “About Us” section on the outlet’s website. This is more accurate for newspapers or smaller publications. Other times, it may be harder to find. Media databases such as Cision and Meltwater are helpful tools to find contact information for journalists at hundreds of thousands of media outlets.

 

Step 6: Organize contacts.

Once research has been completed to find the right publications and reporters, organize and track the information so you can refer back it to at later time. Since the majority of our efforts are conducted through personalized outreach rather than blasted out through a media database, many of us organize them through Google Docs so they’re always accessible, easy to share with peers, and can be updated in real-time. Use columns and rows to track reporter name, job title, email address, phone number, Twitter handle, bio page and other important information.

 

Step 7: Keep media list up-to-date.

Once the list is built, the work is far from over. The media list will need to be updated regularly so you can stay on top of any role changes that could affect future pitching efforts. In addition, make sure to monitor the beats and job titles of any reporters on media lists, in case they change.

 

While these tips may be helpful, enlisting the help of a PR agency such as Dittoe PR is the surefire way to ensure PR goals are met. If you’re interested in learning more about Dittoe PR, contact Lauryn Gray at lauryn@dittoepr.com