Easy Ways to Amplify Media Coverage (Outside of Social Media)

Here at Dittoe PR, we secure amazing media coverage every day for our clients. But the efforts shouldn’t stop after sending the coverage link to the client. It’s important to keep the momentum going and maximize the exposure for each piece of meaningful media coverage. Since we already gave you a rundown on how to amplify media coverage via social media, here are some additional ways PR professionals can widen the reach of secured stories.

COMPANY WEBSITE
A company website is the heart of any brand, so leverage this space as a media amplification tactic by creating a landing page for company news. Here are some tips on how to have a fantastic press page:

  • Put a separate press release section on the press page. This helps website visitors differentiate between what is being shared by the company and what is actually secured media coverage.
  • Make it easy to find. It should be predominantly on the top of the navigation bar on the homepage.
  • Keep the verbiage concise. Keep it to the headline or a one sentence overview of the coverage.
  • Incorporate memorable quotes. Memorable quotes from media coverage act as testimonials for your company, thus proving your credibility. They can also show website visitors you deserve their business.


LEVERAGE AS CONTENT IN E-NEWSLETTERS
Leveraging news stories in e-newsletters is another great way to build your credibility, communicate your impact and create opportunities for touchpoints with current stakeholders, clients or customers. So, once a piece of coverage hits the web, consider how to incorporate the story in your email newsletter strategy. Depending on the frequency of coverage, consider grouping multiple stories into one email for maximum impact.

SHARE INTERNALLY
Don’t underestimate the importance of sharing media coverage with your colleagues or staff. Send around an email with a link and ask colleagues to share the coverage on their own social media networks. In addition, if the media coverage is shared on the outlet’s social media channels, make sure to ask employees to also “Like” or “Share” the post, as well as add a positive comment. This tactic helps keep the conversation going, draws more attention to the earned media and fosters a continued relationship with the outlet.

In addition, consider if the media coverage would make sense to share with partners or current investors to strengthen the partnership and expand the reach of the coverage through their networks. If you have partnered with any investors in the industry as well, this would be a great opportunity to share the coverage with them to see if they can share on their personal channels.

SHARE WITH POTENTIAL INVESTORS & CUSTOMERS
Media coverage can reassure potential investors about the interest in your company and potentially help lock in new rounds of funding. Sending media coverage to potential partners should be handled appropriately. Rather than bombarding them with every new piece of coverage secured, use it as a tactic to follow-up with an investor and continue the conversation by leveraging some top hits or a roundup of hits.

In addition, media coverage adds third-party credibility to messaging and can act like a compelling tool for validating sales team’s conversation with potential customers or stakeholders whether on sales calls or at trade shows.

Now that you know how to share great media coverage, perhaps you need help securing some? Contact Lauryn Gray at lauryn@dittoepr.com to set up a consultation today! 

What cuts in journalism jobs mean for PR

There are six public relations professionals for every journalist.

In 1980, the ratio was 1.2 to 1.

These ratios, pulled from recent U.S. Department of Labor statistics, illustrate just how dramatically the media relations landscape has fluctuated in the last 40 years. Especially in 2019, it’s clear that the media industry – and by extension public relations and media relations – is shifting as a result of waves of layoffs, changes in business models and the rise of influencers and citizen journalists in the internet age.

Below, we explore the evolution of journalism, what it means for the PR industry and the role of PR pros during the transformation.

What’s the reality?
Earlier this year, local and national news organizations announced waves of layoffs as a result of traditional newsroom downsizing and budget cuts. The latest reports show more than 2,200 people lost their jobs in this latest round of layoffs, setting a dark tone for 2019.

The print industry in particular is seeing an increase in layoffs as a result of recent transitions. Between January 2017 and April 2018, at least 36 percent of the largest newspapers across the U.S. – as well as at least 23 percent of the highest-traffic digital-native news outlets – experienced layoffs, according to a PEW Research study. Additionally, buyouts and mergers have clouded the landscape in a fight to find the right business models to bring monetization and higher profitability to online media in particular.

This news is negative for all of us — journalists, media outlets, PR people, citizens and democracy.

In this landscape, it’s also important to realize the pay gap that exists between PR professionals. Back in 2000, the pay gap between the PR pros and reporters was a little more than $6,000 annually. In 2017, the difference in salary increased $16,000. With a figure like that, it’s clear why many reporters are leaving their roles and transitioning into related fields such as PR, marketing and advertising.

What does it mean?
As the audience of journalists shrinks and number of PR pros grows, it’s harder than ever to get media coverage. Because journalists are heavily outnumbered, they are constantly bombarded with pitches.

To combat the clutter, PR pros must tailor each message to specific reporters and think like a journalist by following some basic journalistic principles such as:

  • Avoid selling and start storytelling, as journalists and as PR professionals, our first goal is storytelling, not selling.
  • Know what’s newsworthy by following five key elements to newsworthiness: timing, significance, proximity, prominence and human interest.
  • Understand your audience by asking: Who are your customers? Who are your clients? And, who are the ideal readers of the story you’re hoping to tell?
  • Verify and research your content, from media pitch, a white paper or a thought leadership article.
  • Strategically structure your writing by following the traditional pyramid model. Your most important and most interesting content belongs at the very top of the pyramid.


What can we do about it?
Despite the many changes brought on by the digital revolution, there continues to be an ongoing need for a new, yet free and honest, press that can be supported by PR pros.

The PR industry should be dedicated to supporting the growth of traditional and non-traditional journalism, and PR pros can have a profound impact on the evolution of journalism by engaging in activities such as:

  • Read news to learn more about the topics impacting your clients, the community and the world at large. This can also help you learn the names and styles of key journalists that you’re wanting to build a relationship with.
  • To directly fund journalism, you should individually support or encourage your agency or company to subscribe to news outlets locally, as well as publications in client verticals.
  • Develop new skills that can make the jobs of journalists easier, such as learning how to use a DSLR camera or write a concise headline to increase the odds of a story being picked up.
  • Consider working with non-traditional media, such as influencers and citizen journalists to spread client stories.
  • Hire journalists looking for a career change to the PR profession, as their skills and inside know-how are invaluable for storytelling and pitching efforts.


No matter how much the media industry shifts, one fact remains: Both professions will continue to work together and rely on one another for many decades to come.

Is your business looking for a way to cut through the clutter and reach key journalists? Contact Lauryn Gray at lauryn@dittoepr.com to schedule a consultation today!






How to Amplify Coverage on Social Media

At Dittoe PR, we often say that media relations is our “bread and butter,” but what does that really mean? Typically, we win big for our clients in securing national, local, and trade media coverage, and we’re always hungry for that next piece of media interest. While we always make sure to show the value of a piece of coverage to our clients, we can also help our clients amplify that coverage on their social media channels, as well as ours.

Why share coverage on social media? For starters, studies show that in 2019 there will be an estimated 2.27 billion social media users around the globe. Yes, that is billion with a “B.” With that many people, you’d be amiss to risk losing out on even a fraction of that audience.

So, I’m breaking down the different social media channels and how sharing coverage on each can help boost your brand.

Facebook
Ah, Facebook. Full of distant relatives and people you went to high school with, it can seem impossible to be seen through the noise on this platform. The key here is to utilize the colorful images that populate when you share the link to that great piece of coverage your stellar PR firm helped you secure.

Keep the caption short and let the headline do the talking, but be sure to tag the media outlet! You can also boost or turn a piece of coverage into an ad, which is a tactic best used with high-caliber media hits. This will help drive new audiences back to your page as well as to the piece of coverage, increasing the chances of a click-thru to your website from multiple avenues.

LinkedIn
Similar to Facebook, LinkedIn is great for sharing coverage as a status update. You can utilize the same tactics by creating a snappy caption and letting the link, photo and the headline do the talking. You can also use LinkedIn’s targeted ads to share coverage directly to your target audiences and potential customers, helping to increase your brand recognition and showcase accomplishments.

As an executive or company spokesperson, you can also share any media interviews you’ve conducted on your personal LinkedIn page under your current job description, allowing the coverage to live permanently on your profile.

Twitter
Twitter is one my personal favorite places to share coverage because you can mix it up. You can oftentimes tag not only the publication, but the reporter as well, increasing your chances of a retweet and getting your content in front of more people. If the outlet or reporter that covered you shares the story, make sure to retweet them. This helps build a great relationship with outlets and reporters and can help generate coverage in the future if they know you’ll help them boost their own engagement numbers as well.

You can also share coverage more than once, using the ICYMI (in case you missed it) tactic, as Twitter still runs off a chronological order timeline, or break down some of the top quotes from the story into a Twitter thread.

Instagram
Instagram might seem a little tricky for sharing coverage, since you can’t link out to a story in your caption. Not to worry, there are plenty of ways around this. If you monitor your social media accounts daily, you can update the link in your bio to a recent piece of coverage. Posting a photo of the article in your feed and using #linkinbio will tell your followers how to find that specific media story.

Our favorite method though, is Instagram stories. If you run a verified account (or have 10,000+ followers), you can add a link to your stories that will direct people to a piece of coverage. If not, feel free to post photos or videos of the article in your story for your users to see your company name in the spotlight. Just seeing your name in the press is enough to strengthen and increase brand awareness.

In the end, social media will never be a “one-size-fits-all” game. What works on Twitter won’t necessarily work on Facebook, and what works on Facebook may still need tweaked in order to be impactful on LinkedIn. Take time to customize each post for the audience and platform to ensure the best results.

Now that you know how to share great media coverage, perhaps you need help securing some? Contact Lauryn Gray at lauryn@dittoepr.com to set up a consultation today!