Now Hiring: Talented Account Coordinator or Executive Needed

Calling all PR pros! We have an immediate opening for an Account Coordinator or Account Executive position.

 

Account Coordinators are responsible for assisting in the execution of strategic public relations initiatives on behalf of the firm’s clients. This entry-level position is an opportunity for a smart, self-starting, detail-oriented individuals to develop a well-rounded roster of public relations skills and contribute to a variety of Dittoe Public Relations’ clients. The ideal candidate will have strong communication skills (both verbal and written), creativity, high energy and an outgoing personality. A strong emphasis is placed on media relations, research and analysis, reporting and client communication.

 

Account Executives are responsible for developing and executing strategic public relations initiatives on behalf of the firm’s clients. The ideal candidate will have excellent communication skills (both verbal and written), strong creativity, high energy and an outgoing personality. A strong emphasis is placed on media relations, strategic account management and client communication. We need self-starters and team players who enjoy spreading the word for the firm’s clients.

 

Limited travel may be required for press tours, trade shows and client meetings. Preference will go toward those with relevant professional work or internship experience in public relations or a related field (agency experience is a plus). Salary will reflect level of experience and includes a great benefits package. Other perks include a gym membership, breakfast on Fridays, a weekly half-day work from home policy, summer flex hours, Wine Wednesdays, the “Wheel of Celebration” to celebrate birthdays and work anniversaries, breakfast/lunch & learns, unlimited vacation time and paid maternity/paternity leave.

 

Account Coordinator Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree in public relations, journalism, marketing, English or a related field
  • Internships or 1-2 years of relevant professional work experience in public relations or a related field (agency experience is a plus)
  • Smart, creative, assertive and innovative individual who thrives in an extremely fast-paced environment
  • Flexibility and willingness to collaborate with teams
  • Must be a versatile writer with both creative and technical writing experience
  • Must demonstrate an understanding of media relations (direct experience is a plus)
  • Proven ability to effectively prioritize and manage multiple tasks and competing deadlines
  • Excellent communication skills, both verbal and written
  • Knowledge in social media, design, photography/videography are a plus

 

Account Executive Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree in public relations, journalism, marketing, English or a related field
  • At least two years of full-time, relevant experience in public relations or a related field (agency experience is a plus)
  • Smart, creative, assertive and innovative individual who thrives in an extremely fast-paced environment
  • Flexibility and willingness to collaborate with teams
  • Must be a talented and versatile writer with both creative and technical writing experience
  • Media relations experience with a successful track record of pitching and securing opportunities
  • Successful track record of developing strategic public relations and social media campaigns
  • Proven ability to manage multiple client accounts in a variety of industries
  • Excellent communication skills, both verbal and written
  • Knowledge in social media, design, photography/videography are a plus

 

For more information about these and other positions, visit our Careers page. To apply, send your cover letter, resume with references, and writing samples to Greta Snell at greta@dittoepr.com.

The dirty secret about online content and shrinking attention spans

RIP-attention-span

 

This article was first published on Ragan’s PR Daily.

 
I’m tired of hearing marketers, journalists, and PR people use “shrinking attention spans” to explain why their content sucks.

In an article about the role of public relations in a rapidly evolving media landscape—with which I otherwise agreed—David Armano, managing director of Edelman Digital Chicago, noted the following.

“The people we want to reach move effortlessly across a media landscape about which they rarely make distinctions. Increasingly, they spend time on mobile devices, skimming content in ‘streams or feeds.’ The average consumer of media has the attention span of a squirrel on Ritalin. Getting them to pause to read anything more than a paragraph is becoming increasingly difficult.”

Shrinking attention spans and squirrel comparisons have become go-to arguments for why people no longer consume long-form articles or online videos lasting longer than two minutes. But this is a cop out. The real reason people don’t consume longer forms of media is that most digital publishers don’t want them to.

Shrinking attention spans are the symptom, not the problem 

Let me be clear, I am not arguing against the body of evidence supporting our diminishing attention spans. Dozens of studies by psychologists, neurobiologists, and educators conclude that the Internet is an environment that promotes perfunctory reading and distracted thinking.
Nor am I accusing anyone on the team at Edelman Digital of producing bad content. They are, in fact, trail blazers in the space.
I’m simply taking exception to the stance that digital publishers can no longer produce compelling long-form content because of shrinking attention spans.

Our shrinking attention spans are the symptom, not the problem.
The problem is that digital media is designed to be clicked, consumed, and spread as quickly as possible. Although the rallying cry is “content is king,” the reality of the Internet is that “clicks are king,” because clicks are what drive ad revenue.

The goal for digital publishers is not to produce well-written, thought-provoking articles and videos, but to create content that can be spread quickly and easily. How can readers quickly spread content if it takes them several minutes to read or watch it? Every single second a reader spends reading an article is one more second that could have been used to encourage the reader to share it, click through to the next piece of content, and repeat. Click, consume, spread.

In fact, it doesn’t even matter if the content is consumed, as long as it’s shared. Reading doesn’t generate ad dollars. So whenever you hear a media pundit proclaim, “Long-form journalism is dead!” what they mean to say is “Long-form journalism isn’t lucrative.”
It’s not that people won’t read long-form content, it’s that the nature of digital publishing has seemingly removed any incentive to produce content that takes longer than eight seconds to consume.

Healthier options are available 

As a result, digital media is being pushed further and further in the direction of becoming the fast food of content—it’s quick, cost effective, and not very good for you. But just as there is growing demand for healthy options at the drive-thru, there are significant changes taking hold in the realm of digital content that stem from the audience’s demand for quality.

For instance, Taulbee Jackson, founder and president of digital marketing firm Raidious, pointed to recent algorithm shifts in social and search platforms, such as Facebook and Google, as evidence of growing demand among consumers for better content. In a recent interview, he explained:

“Search results ranking algorithms like Google’s Panda and Penguin and Facebook’s EdgeRank were put in place to defend users against being exposed to bad content. Think about the ramifications for that. There is so much bad content that these companies felt it was necessary to help their users proactively filter out all the irrelevant noise. That is a big deal.” 

You can also look to movements like the one led by Mark Armstrong, founder of Longreads.com, as evidence of our growing demand for quality.
Longreads posts daily links to long-form journalism and magazine stories from publications including The New YorkerThe Atlantic, and Rolling Stone, as well as short stories, interview transcripts, historical documents and yes, even blog posts.

As the name suggests, a typical Longread is at least 1,500 words. The @longreads Twitter account has more than 82,600 followers, many of whom use the hashtag #longreads to share URLs to long-form stories they find around the Web.

Short doesn’t always equal bad 

I’m not suggesting that when it comes to content, long equals good and short equals bad. I, like everyone else, applauded Oreo’s profoundly simple, yet genius Super Bowl blackout tweet. But saying that people won’t—or as many arguments suggest—can’t process something more substantial than a picture of an Oreo followed by seven words because of their eroding attentions spans is simply untrue.

Marketers, PR people and journalists: Before you start dissecting what is an otherwise great piece of content just so that it can be consumed in the amount of time it takes to read this sentence, please reconsider. Your audience will read it. Then they will share it. And you will have engaged them in a way that few have.

It’s in the hole! Our personal Cinderella story

Dittoe dominates the BMW Championship scorecard, helping client Western Golf Association win PGA TOUR tournament of the year honor

“Cinderella story. Outta nowhere. It looks like a mirac-…It’s in the hole! It’s in the hole! It’s in the hole!” – “Caddyshack”

Back in February, Dittoe Public Relations faced long odds. It had submitted a proposal to be the local media relations firm of record for the Western Golf Association (WGA), which would host the BMW Championship PGA TOUR event at Crooked Stick Golf Course in Carmel, Ind., seven months later.

Tiger Woods. Rory McIlroy. Phil Mickelson. For one week in September golf’s biggest names would turn Central Indiana into the sport’s Mecca. Dittoe, a small boutique firm, had never landed a client with such a wide impact – in the sports world, on the Hoosier economy – as the WGA and its tournament.

Dittoe would go on to beat the odds and win the bid to represent the WGA and the BMW Championship, breaking through barriers in traditional and new media along the way. The greatest reward came just last week, when the PGA TOUR named the BMW Championship its tournament of the year.

It’s our Cinderella story.

Dittoe’s overriding task was to increase local awareness of the tournament through media relations. It was a formidable job: The 2012 BMW Championship marked the first time since the 1991 PGA Championship that the PGA TOUR had competed in Indiana. And since 1962, the BMW Championship (previously known as the Western Open) had been held outside greater Chicago only once.

Professional golf, unlike basketball and football and auto racing, was not on Hoosiers’ collective conscience.

Thorough analysis of the Indianapolis market and regional media landscape set the stage for success. Dittoe’s personalized pitching led to more than 1,100 pieces of media coverage. In total, the BMW Championship witnessed more than 1.14 billion impressions in print and online media.

Traditional media, it turned out, wasn’t Dittoe’s only strength.

Social media would emerge as an important tool in engaging Hoosiers about the BMW Championship, and Dittoe’s unique approach wowed WGA officials. Just like with traditional media, social media had its challenges; namely, the BMW Championship Twitter handle was left practically dormant for years.

To generate buzz, Dittoe created the “Place the Pin” promotion, a sweepstakes that took place on Twitter and in the real world. Eighteen “Place the Pin” pin flag exhibits were placed in locations around Indianapolis and Carmel. During an 18-day span, participants were asked to tweet photos of themselves at the various exhibits in a scavenger hunt-style format to win daily prizes of ticket giveaways that culminated in a grand prize of a VIP ticket package. Also, a flag signed by four of golf’s biggest names – Tiger Woods, 2011 BMW Championship winner Justin Rose, Camilo Villegas and Dustin Johnson – was given away in a “Capture the Flag” contest to cap the promotion.

Be careful not to underestimate the power of social media.

“Place the Pin” drew more than 700 local participants and increased the @BMWchamps’ Twitter handle Klout score from 17 to 64 – in less than three weeks’ time. Additionally, a redemption promo code that was part of the promotion led to more than $10,000 in ticket revenue.

Here are a few takeaways that might help with your next social media project:

  • Make the prize relevant to the client. Don’t host an iPad giveaway unless your client sells cases for iPads. Giving away a prize that has nothing to do with your client might help increase your following in the short term, but they will be the wrong kinds of fans.
  • Consider the barrier to entry. How much effort does someone need to put in to win or enter your contest? Don’t make contests difficult unless the prize you’re offering is worth the effort.
  • People love participation trophies. If possible, make sure that everyone who enters your contest or sweepstakes gets something. Coupons or online offers are best since you avoid the hassle of shipping a physical item.
  • Use participants to spread the word. Plan your contest so participants are forced to share their entries with their friends and followers.

The BMW Championship drew more than 140,000 spectators to Crooked Stick Golf Club, making it one of the top-attended PGA TOUR events in 2012. Through traditional media outreach and modern social media strategies, Dittoe dominated the scorecard in publicizing and sparking engagement.

It’s our Cinderella story.

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