Tips for Responding to Customer Feedback on Social Media

Maintaining a presence on social media allows brands to connect with consumers on a more personal level and participate in online discussions related to their products, industry and more. With 81 percent of Americans actively using social media and more than 58 percent of users engaging with brands one to three times per day, it’s clear that consumers prefer to communicate with brands online.

 

Regardless of the engagements sentiment, when customers engage with your brand online, it is important to make them feel heard. There are a number of ways to respond to customer feedback on social media, so we’ve outlined a few tips to help:

 

Respond in real time.

Consistently monitoring your brands social media accounts will allow for quick action. Some platforms, like Facebook, even show users what your brands average response time is to encourage brands to monitor in real time.

 

If a customer reaches out with feedback via social media, a response should be posted – whether it be liking the comment, responding in kind, or assisting to escalate a customer service issue – within 24 hours at the most.

 

Personalize.

The last thing a customer wants is to just feel like their voice is not being heard. When responding to engagements online, personalize your response as much as possible to show your appreciation for their feedback.

 

If you’re using a bot to respond to customer service messages, be sure to follow up with a personal note to make sure the issue has been resolved.

 

Maintain a brand presence.

Does your brand have a team of social media responders? If so, it’s necessary to outline approved responses and provide employees with a brand guide. This will help to present a uniform face to customers, while still allowing your brand to engage naturally online.

 

If you don’t have brand guidelines established, revisit your social media strategy and reference any key messages outlined.

 

Take it offline.

When responding to negative comments online, brand should remember not to dwell on the negative, but to treat the feedback as an opportunity to grow. Ask the customer to send a direct message through the platform by which they originally engaged your brand. This will allow you to troubleshoot, ask for personal information, and more without leaving the platform.

 

Offer a solution.

There will always be people you just can’t please. And that’s okay as long as your brand is actively working toward a solution with its customers! Ensure that your team is offering uniform solutions and staying on brand when resolving customer service issues.

 

Need help building a strategy that works for your brand? Contact Lauryn Gray, lauryn@dittoepr.com, or request a consultation today!

How to Build a Social Media Strategy That Works for Your Business

Some of you may be wondering what is a social media strategy and is it necessary for my business? To answer your first question, a social media strategy is simply an extension of a business’ overall marketing and public relations strategy. Built to support the achievement of company-wide goals, social media strategies should outline campaigns and tactics for key social media channels. As for the second question, YES! Every business, whether it’s a startup or a Fortune 500 company, should have a presence on social media.

 

Percent of U.S. adults who say they use the following social media sites online or on their cellphone – via Pew Research Center

With 68 percent of U.S. adults using the platform regularly, Facebook is by far one of the most popular social media platforms available for marketers. But the social media narrative extends far beyond the “walls” of Facebook. Since 2016, the use of Instagram by U.S. adults has increased from 28 percent to more than 35 percent, with higher numbers reported from 18-24 year olds, making it the second most-used platform.

 

You may now be asking if your business should be present and active on all social media platforms, from the “big-box” names like Facebook and Instagram to the lesser-known platforms like Snapchat and Pinterest. The average American uses three of the top eight, and while it’s not necessary to be present on each and every channel, it is recommended to select the most important platforms based on your target audiences and team’s ability to implementing a cohesive strategy.

 

Implementing a social media strategy will improve your business in more ways than one. Below are the top benefits for implementing a strategic plan on social media:

 

Creating a face for your company online.

In addition to providing an online presence housed outside of your website, the use of a social media strategy will improve search engine optimization (SEO), allowing your company’s name and product name(s) to appear in more relevant searches when using key terms and phrases.

 

Increasing knowledge about products and offerings.

Additionally, the strategic use of social media will help to build brand awareness and exposure. Drafting content that includes direct links back to your company’s website can also help to increase web traffic and conversion rates as well as provide valuable feedback from customers.

 

Proving ROI in relation to marketing goals.

Reaching new and niche audiences can be challenging using traditional marketing tactics. With a strategic social media strategy, companies can target specific audiences directly through advertisements and boosted posts, as well as reach audience members in a more authentic way.

 

Need help building a strategy that works for your business? Contact Lauryn Gray, lauryn@dittoepr.com, or request a consultation today!

Best Practices To Use on Social Media During a Crisis

Let’s face it. In today’s fast-paced and ever-changing world, we use social media more and more to digest our news rather than traditional media. Nearly 67 percent of American adults rely on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Snapchat for news. So, when a crisis strikes, the information is at our fingertips at lightning speed.

 

News coverage 24/7 has transformed the way we seek and share information, but what does that mean for brands? If you ever find yourself in a crisis, take a deep breath, buckle-up, and get ready for the ride. Here are a few social media best practices when dealing with a crisis:

 

Have a plan.

Hopefully you’re reading this before disaster strikes and have time to proactively create a crisis action plan. This plan will help the team understand their roles during a crisis and allow them to be prepared for every scenario that could possibly go wrong with your brand. Don’t wait until something blows up; brainstorm with your team and list out any and all possible problems that could arise. You then have time to create well-written responses and a good plan of action no matter what comes your way.

 

Be quick to respond.

When crisis strikes, response time is everything. If possible, responding within the first hour of inquiries will help minimize confusion or speculation. Reference your crisis communication plan and draft a statement immediately, individualizing when possible. It’s easier to change the course of the conversation with a timely, heartfelt response rather than staying silent and looking suspicious.

 

Monitor in real-time.

Whether the entire team or just one person is in charge of the task, it is important to have someone dedicated to monitoring your social media 24/7. You can’t deal with a possible situation if you don’t know what is happening in real-time. Create Google Alerts for your company, product(s), and keywords related to your industry. Hootsuite and Sprout Social are also good tools to monitor social media mentions and engagements in real-time. Stop havoc before it happens, or turn your crisis into a win like Reese’s did with their #AllTreesAreBeautiful campaign.

 

I’m sure you’ve opened a Reese’s Peanut Butter Tree at Christmas and its looked a little off. Well, instead of shying away from the backlash, Reese’s launched its #AllTreesAreBeautiful ad campaign. With a bit of hard work, the ad campaign received more than 1 billion impressions. Their emotional and cultural relevance as a brand took off and made a huge impact.

 

Speak your audience’s language.

You use your brand’s voice on all forms of social media every other day of the year—don’t turn into a robot just because you’re in crisis mode. Be professional where it’s called for on platforms like LinkedIn and use a lighter voice with more imagery on platforms like Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Each social media platform has its own tone, as does each brand. Adjust it with your audience in mind but stay true to who you are.

 

If you don’t already have a plan in place for handling a crisis of any magnitude, now is the time to create one, and Dittoe PR is here to help. Request a consultation with us today!

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