How to Amplify Coverage on Social Media

At Dittoe PR, we often say that media relations is our “bread and butter,” but what does that really mean? Typically, we win big for our clients in securing national, local, and trade media coverage, and we’re always hungry for that next piece of media interest. While we always make sure to show the value of a piece of coverage to our clients, we can also help our clients amplify that coverage on their social media channels, as well as ours.

Why share coverage on social media? For starters, studies show that in 2019 there will be an estimated 2.27 billion social media users around the globe. Yes, that is billion with a “B.” With that many people, you’d be amiss to risk losing out on even a fraction of that audience.

So, I’m breaking down the different social media channels and how sharing coverage on each can help boost your brand.

Facebook
Ah, Facebook. Full of distant relatives and people you went to high school with, it can seem impossible to be seen through the noise on this platform. The key here is to utilize the colorful images that populate when you share the link to that great piece of coverage your stellar PR firm helped you secure.

Keep the caption short and let the headline do the talking, but be sure to tag the media outlet! You can also boost or turn a piece of coverage into an ad, which is a tactic best used with high-caliber media hits. This will help drive new audiences back to your page as well as to the piece of coverage, increasing the chances of a click-thru to your website from multiple avenues.

LinkedIn
Similar to Facebook, LinkedIn is great for sharing coverage as a status update. You can utilize the same tactics by creating a snappy caption and letting the link, photo and the headline do the talking. You can also use LinkedIn’s targeted ads to share coverage directly to your target audiences and potential customers, helping to increase your brand recognition and showcase accomplishments.

As an executive or company spokesperson, you can also share any media interviews you’ve conducted on your personal LinkedIn page under your current job description, allowing the coverage to live permanently on your profile.

Twitter
Twitter is one my personal favorite places to share coverage because you can mix it up. You can oftentimes tag not only the publication, but the reporter as well, increasing your chances of a retweet and getting your content in front of more people. If the outlet or reporter that covered you shares the story, make sure to retweet them. This helps build a great relationship with outlets and reporters and can help generate coverage in the future if they know you’ll help them boost their own engagement numbers as well.

You can also share coverage more than once, using the ICYMI (in case you missed it) tactic, as Twitter still runs off a chronological order timeline, or break down some of the top quotes from the story into a Twitter thread.

Instagram
Instagram might seem a little tricky for sharing coverage, since you can’t link out to a story in your caption. Not to worry, there are plenty of ways around this. If you monitor your social media accounts daily, you can update the link in your bio to a recent piece of coverage. Posting a photo of the article in your feed and using #linkinbio will tell your followers how to find that specific media story.

Our favorite method though, is Instagram stories. If you run a verified account (or have 10,000+ followers), you can add a link to your stories that will direct people to a piece of coverage. If not, feel free to post photos or videos of the article in your story for your users to see your company name in the spotlight. Just seeing your name in the press is enough to strengthen and increase brand awareness.

In the end, social media will never be a “one-size-fits-all” game. What works on Twitter won’t necessarily work on Facebook, and what works on Facebook may still need tweaked in order to be impactful on LinkedIn. Take time to customize each post for the audience and platform to ensure the best results.

Now that you know how to share great media coverage, perhaps you need help securing some? Contact Lauryn Gray at lauryn@dittoepr.com to set up a consultation today!








Social Media Advertising: The Basics

So, you want to advertise on social media? Smart choice. Not only is advertising on social media more accessible for small businesses, it’s also more effective.

 

According to the Global Web Index, “the average internet user now spends about 15 minutes longer each day on social platforms than they do watching TV.” With 50 percent of people using Facebook daily, and more than 2.2 billion monthly active users on the platform, this platform is a great place to start.

 

Facebook, and by extension Instagram, is the most popular platform for social media advertising. But depending on the type of ad you’re running or the audience you’re hoping to reach, advertising on Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest or even YouTube may be a better option.

 

USING VARIOUS PLATFORMS TO PROMOTE DIFFERENT TYPES OF CONTENT

At Dittoe PR, we have clients advertising across the top four social media channels: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram.

 

With each of these platforms, there are obvious differences to the types of content being shared on each channel. For example, using LinkedIn for business-focused content and using Instagram for photo and video sharing. There are also nuanced differences to the types of advertisements you can create, the copy and creative used for each and the demographics available for targeting. Let me break it down for you!

 

Types of ads.

Knowing the difference between when to boost an existing post versus create an advertisement is important. First, look at the copy and creative you plan to use. Many platforms such as Facebook, limit the content for ad copy to less than 100 characters. If you’re looking to share more information, a boosted post may be your best bet. This allows the information to live on your page after the ad has run its course.

 

If you’re promoting an upcoming event, like a flash sale, a grand opening or a hiring announcement, and you’re okay just sharing the essential information – OR – if you want the content to be removed from your page after the ad ends, consider creating an advertisement instead.

 

Demographic targeting.
Each platform offers various demographics to target by, including location, age, gender, income, interests, job title/function, employer and more.

 

Knowing the audience you’re trying to reach with an advertisement is likely the most important step in creating a social media ad. If you end up targeting the wrong group of users, the advertisement will not be successful. A common practice we use at Dittoe PR is reviewing third-party or channel-specific reports for each individual channel, or the channel you plan to promote, and taking a closer look at the age, gender and location of your followers.

 

If you’re trying to target people that don’t currently follow you, reach out to the users with demographics that fall outside of your top followers. But, if you’re trying to promote a new service or newsworthy coverage to your followers, or users like them, targeting your top follower demographics is a great idea!

 

For example, one of our client’s goals this quarter is to reach a larger audience of fitness enthusiasts. To align with this goal, we promoted copy and creative that discussed the recovery benefits to massage therapy to coincide with the fact that most people make New Year’s resolutions to “get fit” or “stay healthy.” We also partnered with local fitness influencers to help spread the message, then we shared and boosted their content to the client’s Facebook pages to further promote this message.

 

HOW TO SELECT CONTENT TO PROMOTE

Sometimes, selecting content to promote can be overwhelming, especially with a client who has a lot going on or provides a wide range of offerings. By focusing on what is truly important on a case-by-case basis, PR pros can break down what types of information are going to be most relevant to the users your clients are trying to reach.

 

Partnership goals.

When promoting content, think back to the primary goals of the PR partnership. Does your client want to gain more followers? Do they want to open a dialogue with their customers? Are they trying to increase foot traffic at a certain location? All of these goals will play into the types of content you’re promoting and the way you’re promoting them.

 

Facebook allows businesses to promote based on a number of potential results, including: getting more leads, promoting your page, getting website visits, promoting your business locally, getting more website purchases, and receiving more messages.

 

Organic performance.

One of the easiest ways to select content to promote is by reviewing your recent top performing content. If a post is performing well organically on your page, throwing some ad dollars behind it and boosting it to a targeted audience is a great idea. It’s pretty common for people to pay more attention to posts that already have garnered engagement, rather than clicking on or reading a post that has no likes or comments.

 

Timely content.

Another great way to select promoted content is by sharing information that would be relevant to your followers.

 

For example, February is American Heart Month and Valentine’s Day takes place on Feb. 14. For our client Massage Heights, we homed in on the heart health benefits stemming from regular massage therapy and including last-minute gift ideas available for purchase.

 

Adversely, for our client Merchants Capital, we regularly promote recent loan closings for affordable housing developments to promote the work of the team and encourage borrowers to contact them for assistance on their next project. These types of posts not only position you as an expert in your field, but they promote your brand in an efficient and relatable way.

 

Want your business to reach new audiences through social media advertising? Learn more about Dittoe PR’s social media services and connect with Lauryn Gray at lauryn@dittoepr.com to set up a consultation!

Three Social Media Tips for a Productive New Year

Each new calendar year brings PR professionals the opportunity to set new goals and get organized. While the majority of pros are researching new media angles, publications and writers, drafting refreshed blog and website content and aligning with their clients’ marketing goals for a successful 2019, social media managers are planning influencer takeovers and social media ad campaigns, while drafting engaging content for various social channels to help support those same marketing and sales goals.

 

You’ve probably already realized social media management is rarely a 9 to 5 job – in fact, it’s nearly the opposite. Depending on your audience and the day of the week, peak times for each social media channel differ. This creates the need for social media managers to need to stay organized and efficient, especially when working on the go.

 

Check out the tips below to help you better manage your time and your social media channels in 2019:

 

Create a Content Calendar

If you’re not already planning ahead for content on social media, you’ve probably found yourself scrambling at the last minute to create sharable content that actually generates engagement with your audience. Instead of reacting in the new year, start by planning the types of content you want to feature on a weekly, monthly, or quarterly basis.

 

Not only will creating this calendar allow you to plan ahead and schedule content in advance, but it will allow you to better plan for new campaigns and company announcements via social, brainstorm and budget effectively, source credible third-party content and more.

 

Also, consider looking into national days that align with your brand, like Treat Yourself Day for Massage Heights Indy or National Hat Day for LIDS, for additional content ideas (just don’t be one of those managers that jumps on every bandwagon for the heck of it, even if it doesn’t align with your brand).

 

Set Reminders for Recurring Tasks

The same way your alarm clock wakes you up in the morning or a calendar event alerts you of an upcoming meeting, using reminders for recurring tasks can be very useful, especially when managing multiple accounts for multiple clients.

 

Not only should you be logging onto your business’ social media accounts on a daily basis to check for notifications, but you should also be creating a daily or weekly list of tasks to execute on behalf of your business on social media. Various tasks include reading and responding to messages and reviews, taking the time to participate in two-way engagement with your followers, and deploying various acquisition tactics to gain new followers.

 

If your business is running paid social ads, you should also be logging on to your ad platform to monitor their performance, adjust budgets, respond to engagements and more.

 

Get Automated Wherever Possible

The use of automation in social media allows social media managers to increase efficiency and encourage growth in the new year. This is by no means an opportunity for social media managers to move into a hands-off role, but rather offers the ability to save time and effort while maximizing results.

 

Social media management platforms like Sprout Social or Hootsuite allow managers to handle multiple accounts in one platform, assign tasks for team members, schedule content, track engagement and other metrics, and provide insight for future strategic planning efforts.

 

IFTTT, or “If This Then That,” is also another great automation tool that allows social media managers to link tasks together based on a trigger. For example, when you publish your next blog post, the IFTTT would then automate and create a Facebook post on your behalf.

 

Think your company could benefit from social media management? Contact Lauryn Gray at lauryn@dittoepr.com to set up a consultation today!